I Want To...Burn Stuff

Jefferson County and Foothills Fire & Rescue have guidelines for recreational fires and burning slash. County rules for fire restrictions and fire bans must be followed.

Recreational Fires

A recreational fire is an outdoor fire burning materials other than rubbish where the fuel being burned is contained in an incinerator, outdoor fireplace, barbeque grill or barbeque pit and has a total fuel area of 3 feet or less in diameter and 2 feet or less in height for pleasure, religious, ceremonial, cooking, warmth or similar purposes.

Recreational fires shall not be conducted within 25 feet of a structure or combustible material. Conditions which could cause a fire to spread within 25 feet of a structure shall be eliminated prior to ignition. Recreational fires shall be constantly attended until the fire is extinguished. A minimum of one portable extinguisher complying with section 906 of the International Fire Code with a minimum 4-A rating or other approved on-site fire-extinguishing equipment, such as dirt, sand, water barrel, garden hose or water truck, shall be available for immediate use.

Before you burn…

  1. Contact Jefferson County Sheriffs’ Office Fire Information Hotline @ 303-271-8200 to find out if there is a fire ban. You CANNOT burn if there is a fire ban.
  2. Contact us to find out what the fire danger rating is. If it is extreme, very high, or high you CANNOT burn.
  3. Notify us so we can be prepared if any residents call 911 asking for a smoke investigation.

We may at our discretion inspect your recreational fire. If you burn without following the district guidelines, you will be subject to a fine after the first warning. If you are authorized by Foothills Fire Protection District to burn, you are liable for any cost or damages incurred if the fire gets out of control.

Burning Slash

For open burning/burning of slash, you need to submit an Application for Open Burning Permit, Slash Pile to Jefferson County.

Fire Restrictions and Fire Bans

Due to the county's geographic makeup, wildfire is always a concern, and it is a more potent threat during droughts or dry spells. Rainfall and cooler temperatures may reduce the danger of wildfire; however, people are encouraged to be vigilant as the danger of fire is always present in the high country. Citizens should use caution when starting and extinguishing campfires, disposing of lighted cigarettes, and other activities that involve the use of fire or sparks.

Fire Restriction

In a Stage 1 (Fire Restriction) status, some examples of prohibited behaviors are:

  • Building, maintaining, attending or using any fire or recreational campfire, except a recreational fire within a permanently constructed fire grate in a developed park, campground, private residence, or picnic area
  • Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site, or while stopped in an area of at least 6 feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all combustible material
  • Using any fireworks.

If you do have a private residential recreational campfire that meets the exemptions above, we encourage you to contact us at (303) 527-0707 and advise us of your start and finish times. That information will prepare us if there are any 911 calls about smoke in our district.

Visit the Jefferson County Sheriff’s website to learn more about what is and is not permitted during a Stage 1 (Fire Restriction) status.

Fire Ban

In a Stage 2 (Fire Ban) status, additional prohibitions take effect. Some examples include:

  • Building, maintaining, attending or using any fire (such as charcoal barbecue grills, recreational campfires, fire pits, portable outdoor fireplaces, chimineas and tiki torches).

Visit the Jefferson County Sheriff’s website to learn more about what is and is not permitted during a Stage 2 (Fire Ban) status.